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Falling Water

September 25, 2011

Guam has had a rainy year.

We’ve seven feet plus of rain this year, including over a foot in the first two weeks of September.  The canoes adjacent to our apartment damned near floated away in a recent storm, and yes, the photo shows I’m not making this up.

The plus side?

Abundant rainfall makes for most excellent waterfalls.

We have mainlanders here this week, and they wanted to see Talofofo Falls.  I’m not a huge fan of Talofofo falls, as paying $12 to ride a ski lift to view a falls in the tropics just doesn’t hold any appeal.

It’s not like one can take photos of the falls through scratched and stained plastic windows.  I suppose we’re supposed to enjoy 135 degrees of airless humid heat in a tin box instead of walking downslope for all of five minutes.

Once there, however, the falls are engaging.

Hydraulic drama.
Of course, this tourist trap is also home to the famous Hero Yokoi cave – the Japanese soldier who hid in the jungle for 27 years.

I’ve been studying this story for some time now, and I’m fairly convinced this hole in the ground ain’t Yokoi’s cavern. I suspect it’s a convenient construct used to lure busloads a Japanese tourists 45 minutes from Tumon Bay to a remote locale so as to separate them from their hard-earned yen.

Perhaps the green bamboo is a clue – I dunno.

Meanwhile, rainwater tumbles to the sea.

Like most attractions on Guam, this is a jumble of old and new; cobbled together via found objects.  That’s the only explanation for plastic statues in front of an interpretive exhibit.

Captain Morgan?  Hardly.  He’s a surfer.  No – really.

If I had to place a dollar value on this place – it’s a two dollar stop as compared to the War in the Pacific Museum, a bargain at three bucks.

The main attraction are the falls, but…

There is one other stop at this mouldering valley which is quite interesting and worthy of a separate post.  We’ll cover that next time.  In the meantime, enjoy Guam’s falling water – for a price comensurate with its appeal.

 

 

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